Baltimore Havens for Creatives

Baltimore and the surrounding suburbs are not lacking in places for creatives, but last Monday night, when I had an hour to myself to write, I struggled with the idea of where to go. I didn’t want to head to my local Starbucks (I have 11 – soon to be 12 – within 3 miles of my home), and I didn’t want to go any place where I couldn’t get into the vibe of the setting.

No offense, friends. Sometimes, we just need a place to go where we can write, or create, without interruption.

So I posed a simple question on Facebook, and I was inundated with the favorite places fellow writers and artists go to create, find some peace, and maybe a little of both.

Here’s a summary of their recommendations. Save this list, and visit these locations often. I hope to see you there, and if I do, the next cup of coffee’s on me (after we are finished creating, of course).

Cafes and Restaurants

Artifact Coffee, 1500 Union Ave., Baltimore (http://artifactcoffee.com/)

Atwater’s, locations in Towson and Belvedere Square, as well as Catonsville, Canton, and elsewhere (http://www.atwaters.biz/)

Barnes and Noble (http://bn.com)

Bean Hollow, 8059 Main St., Historic Ellicott City (https://www.yelp.com/biz/bean-hollow-ellicott-city)

The Bun Shop, 239 Read St., Baltimore (https://www.yelp.com/biz/the-bun-shop-baltimore)

Caffe Bene, 10039 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City (https://www.yelp.com/biz/caffe-bene-ellicott-city)

Common Ground Cafe, 819 W. 36th St., Baltimore (http://www.commongroundhampden.com/)

The French Twist Cafe in Sykesville (http://www.frenchtwistcafe.com/)

Red Emmas: The Greenmount Coffee Lab, Two locations at 20 W. North Ave. and 1400 Greenmount Ave. (in Open Works), Baltimore (https://redemmas.org/gcl)

Paper Moon Diner, 227 West 29th St., Baltimore (http://www.papermoondiner24.com/)

R House, 301 West 29th St., Baltimore (http://r.housebaltimore.com/)

Red Canoe Cafe, 4337 Harford Road, Lauraville, MD (http://redcanoecafe.virb.com/)

Rise Up Coffee, 618 Dover Rd., Easton, MD (https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g41121-d3196546-Reviews-Rise_Up_Coffee-Easton_Talbot_County_Maryland.html)

Tous Les Jours, 9380 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City (http://www.tljus.com/)

Museums and Libraries

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore (https://artbma.org/)

College libraries (St. Mary’s, Goucher, Towson’s CLA building)

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Main location, Baltimore (http://www.prattlibrary.org/)

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (https://www.nga.gov/)

Natural Settings, Creative Spaces

Bon Secours, Marriotsville, MD (https://rccbonsecours.com/)

Commerce Street Creamery Cafe Bistro, 110 N. Commerce St.,  Centreville, MD (http://creamerycafebistro.com/)

Cromwell Valley Park, 2175 Cromwell Bridge Rd., Towson, MD (http://www.cromwellvalleypark.org/)

Cylburn Arboretum Association, 4915 Greenspring Ave., Baltimore, MD (http://cylburn.org/)

Idlewild Park, Easton, MD (http://eastonmd.gov/ParksAndRec/Idlewild.html)

Loch Raven Dam, Can be accessed from Cromwell Bridge Road Loch Raven Drive, and Morgan Mill Road, Hampton or Glen Arm, MD (http://lochraventrails.com/about-loch-raven-reservoir/)

Open Works, 1400 Greenmount Ave., Baltimore (http://www.openworksbmore.com/)

Own office space in PJs! We can never underestimate the power of the dining room table!

Root Studio, 9140 Guilford Rd., Suite D, Columbia, MD (https://www.therootstudio.org/) Another open space for creatives

Third Haven Meeting House, 405 S. Washington St., Easton, MD (http://www.thirdhaven.org/)

The Wood and Stone Retreat, Crisfield, MD (http://www.woodandstoneretreat.com)

 

Baltimore’s Nasty Press Holds Fundraiser, Provides Platform For Local Voices

It all started last summer with a cool sticker at Open Works in Baltimore.

For five consecutive Fridays, I had the good fortune of working with 25 teens in Baltimore City through the Bloomberg Arts Internship Program. We met at Open Works, a collaborative space for creatives. In the main lobby, between the classrooms and the Greenmount Coffee Lab (highly recommended), local literature rested on a small wooden table. Sipping the daily roast, I walked over to see what literary opportunities were happening in Baltimore.

A small sticker, with the words “NASTY PRESS,” stood out. I picked it up out of curiosity, stuck it in my pocket, and returned to the workshop.

That night, I did a quick search on Facebook, and there they were. I was immediately drawn to their quick surge in Baltimore providing what I call “Literary Advocacy.” In just a few short months, they had created a space for locals to share their stories that, until now, had no real platform to be heard.

How appropriate to discover them in a place called Open Works.

I reached out to the founders of Nasty Press and asked them three simple questions. Here are their responses, just as they supplied them. Any attempt on my part to paraphrase would be ridiculous and, quite frankly, rude.

They’ve got a fundraiser happening at the end of the week as well. See below for more details.

The need for these voices to be heard cannot be overstated. I support Zoey, Em, and XoChitl in the work they are doing for all of us.

The Baltimore Writer: Please tell us the origins of Nasty Press, the purpose for starting, and its current state.

Nasty Press: After the election last November, the three of us separately noticed a shift in Baltimore’s creative energy. It felt almost like a power-outage. There were expressions of rage, sadness, fear, and joy all over social media, but it seemed like the artistic communal hub that we’ve each grown from was at a stand still. We each separately concluded that artists needed a push to re-direct their energy; that maybe they needed an unbiased, open and inclusive place to showcase their emotions and artistic responses about what was happening socially and politically, instead of only ranting on the internet. There needed to be a place without labels that doesn’t exclude anyone, but which uplifts the creative voices of Baltimore, no matter who you are or how you feel. We wanted to generate constructive discussion, even if that meant pissing some people off.

We are in the throes of formatting our second issue which tackles mental health and mental illness in the Baltimore community. We were blown away by the submissions we received and we can’t wait to release this issue to the public. Our FundRager will help fund the printing of the zine along with raising donations for select local non-profits.

TBW: What kind of space are you providing Baltimore citizens, and how might publishing their works further your mission?

NP: Much like collectives before ours in Maryland, we are cultivating space and time for voices that feel and are unheard. We provide a space for visual art (illustration, painting, drawing, etc.), poetic and creative writing, film and photography, and live music and performances. Our collective exists in print format as well a literal venue for local artists. We cater events toward current socio-political issues aiming to benefit the people that are directly affected. This past September, as a result of the potential ban on trans people in the military, we hosted a mini art fair in which we showcased visual art, poetry, and music from our POC and trans/queer family in Baltimore. This event was entirely free to participate in and to attend, and the artists kept 100% of their earnings. We are planning a similar but larger event in April 2018.

TBW: Your work is important, even essential. But you are just one opportunity where we need many. How might you encourage others to do what you are doing to strengthen your larger mission?

NP: We are transparent and tangible. We are open about the way that we operate, and we are accessible to all communities. We never have a cover charge at our events and no artist is ever charged to submit work to the zine nor to participate in our events. We are showing people in our community that it isn’t difficult to get the ball rolling; all you need is passion, drive, and friendship. You don’t need a degree or money, you just gotta stand up and speak up, and people will listen. Recently, we’ve met with organizations, such as Planned Parenthood of Maryland, to discuss future collaborations in hopes to generate more active socio-political dialogue in our community. 

Their upcoming event, FundRager², will be held on Friday December 15, from 8pm to 1am. For more information, including the venue address, please visit their Instagram at @nastypress, email them at thenastypress@gmail.com, or find them on Facebook at Nasty Press.

 

 

Paralyzing Times for Creatives

Paralyzing Times for Creatives

Raw Thoughts of a Creative: November 2017 Edition

At the beginning of the year, I set some very realistic goals of submitting six unique pieces in competitions or for publication in new markets, an average of about one every other month. I thought this was setting the bar a little low, to be honest with you. I had just come off a phenomenal end to 2016, hitting the Amazon best-seller list with my Christmas anthology of fiction, essays, and assorted ponderings.

So here we are just days away from December 2017, and a quick check at the submission checklist leaves little room for interpretation of how this year has gone:

Submissions: 7. Rejections: 7.

As if that isn’t bad enough, my journaling has dried up to a wandering banter of nothingness, stale air of words that, when pushed together on the page, signify nothing.

Depressing, to say the least.

I’m wondering if other creatives are feeling the same way, experiencing the same funk, and questioning the quantity of quality work still in the creative well.

I’m certainly not short of assumptions why this might be. The situation in our country has polarized most of us, and nothing is shocking us anymore. Terrorists are killing Americans on our own soil by the dozens per incident, and we are tired of lifting thoughts and prayers, angry that our efforts in action are not enough, furious of the partisan politics that comes into the double-standard ways of American Life here in 2017.

There have been paralyzing challenges within my own family and friend circle, and that’s enough to strangle the creative quill from budging across the page.

It seems like everything I want to write about I can’t, or won’t, because I don’t want to deal with the politicization of it.

These are indeed paralyzing times for creatives.

So what do we do? I feel like I just need to keep writing, push through it. But the truth is that I don’t even have a passion anymore for what’s on the other side of the product. I’m not interested in marketing my work, making a point, even changing a life.

I’m just so angry and fed up with where we all are. It seems like the older I get, the more I see so transparently how exhaustive the battle is just to keep things at status quo.

I want to make a difference, but I wonder if that’s possible anymore.

I’ll end this post with an encouraging (I hope) thought:

We all get tired from time to time, worn and beaten down by the frustration, the attacks against us, the bewilderment over how we can get to where we are as a society. I think all creatives, for centuries, go through this. We end up lying on the mat, bloodied, tired, near resignation. We’ve been here so many times. Is it really worth it to get up one more time?

The answer: Yes. It is always worth it. Push your bloody knuckles into the sweat-covered mat and push yourself up. Grab hold of the rope and lift yourself to stare all that fights you squarely in the face, and carry on, whether it is with a pen, a brush, or a guitar pick. We are still alive, and we are still here. We are still commanded to do our work and capture this time as only we can.

So reject me another seven times. I don’t really care. And another seven. And maybe even another seven. Go right ahead. Because one of these times, I’m going to break through, and you are going to know what this relentless Creative is all about.

No. I will not go gently. And to all the other creatives out there struggling: Hang in there. I believe in you as I know you believe in me. Together, we cannot be silenced.

Understanding Our Frustrations And Realizing New Pathways To Resolutions

Understanding Our Frustrations And Realizing New Pathways To Resolutions

America is facing its greatest crisis in my lifetime, and I am realizing that each of us is called to react and act in ways that define our communities, large and small.

In the simplest of terms, here’s how I see it.

In our lifetimes, we are presented with scenarios that are not always directly related to our actions. In other words, we didn’t ask for the things that are bringing us stress. In such moments, we are presented with options of how we can react. Some of us turn inward; others seek spiritual guidance; many seek out advice from others. On some level, we combine these approaches to understand our frustrations.

Keeping this in its simplest terms, we have ourselves, we have spirituality, we have books, and we have others to guide us.

Most of the things that frustrate us are fleeting events where our reactions are governed by basic morals. Somebody has 30 items in the “fast lane” checkout at the grocery store, and we make a choice to wait or seek out a faster lane. We can control an immediate action and solve the problem to our satisfaction.

But with the things that frustrate us longer, such as socioeconomics, health benefits, or the conditions of our communities, we don’t have quick answers, and we seek comfort and camaraderie in the time we are frustrated. This, too, is natural.

We create websites, social media groups, attend meetings, and seek out leaders who understand us and who can help us with our frustrations.

This is where each of us matters in how we handle our frustrations and how we choose the leaders we listen to.

Over time, an energy is created out of our frustrations. if we spend more of that energy seeking out acknowledgment and justification, rather than working individually and collaboratively on solving those frustrations, the energy focuses on the problem and not on the solution. It becomes easy to accept the acknowledgment and the rhetoric used to make you believe you are heard and understood.

This is what political campaigns usually do. They rally an understanding of frustration and say, “Believe in me. I am the only person who can fix your problems and relieve your frustrations.” There is a promise made built on the energy manifested in that emotion and that frustration.

This is common in all sides of politics: something isn’t working; I can fix it. It isn’t Democrat, Republican, or any one individual; it’s the nature of politics when we have elections.

The problem we face today is that the pre-election frustration that was manifested into energy still exists, and it continues to manifest into something dangerous. It has momentum; it was given promises, it was given compassion and recognition, and now it is taking on a life of its own with the very people who justified it and are doing nothing to stop it.

Here’s the point. When protesters showed up in Charlottesville armed with weapons and shields, they personified the manifestation of that energy’s breaking point. When an individual made the decision to drive his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, he, too, was a manifestation of that energy.

But that is all that it is: energy. The very simple thing I know is that the only way to stop energy such as this is to cease feeding into it. Release the energy that fuels the frustration and make the choice – today – to return to the origins of your frustration and start again.

We can turn inward, we can counsel spiritual guidance, we can read books, we can seek solace and understanding in a community.

But this time, we must let our morals, our ethics, our spiritual compass, guide us in a direction of peace. Let there be a manifestation of energy that does not require physical weapons and shields, that the only daggers we use are words to slay the hatred and give peace a chance to manifest in a new way for all.

Dare to strike a new path, a new approach toward resolving the things that frustrate us. What we are doing is not working.

It’s not too late. May we come together to recognize our frustrations. May we work together to resolve them. May we all stay together as we forge a new era of peace here in these United States of America, and across the globe.

Rus VanWestervelt (@rusvw13, rus.vanwestervelt@gmail.com)

Hungry Harvest: A Healthy Choice That Helps Many

Hungry Harvest: A Healthy Choice That Helps Many

It started with a poolside conversation with a friend of ours who teaches in the Baltimore City school system. Hungry Harvest had partnered up with the schools in her area, and she was sharing — quite supportively — Hungry Harvest’s mission and the healthy impact they were having with children who lacked the finances and resources for a balanced diet.

My wife and I are no strangers to healthy eating. We’ve ventured on many vegetarian journeys (and for me, a few stints as a vegan), over the last few decades. We did it for ourselves, though, and it didn’t go much further than that.

Two things of importance here. First, we’ve also struggled with the lure of quick foods and the decadent experiences of some of the taboo delicacies. It’s easy for us to get sucked into that routine of convenient and tasty meals.

Second, we’ve looked at a lot of Co-Op deals with local farmers. Most of them are pretty good, if not outstanding. Nearly all of them, however, are asking for a full-season (usually 20-24 weeks) kind of commitment. And, the variation of fruits and vegetables you receive each week would leave us a little worried that we would be getting too much kale and not enough peaches, cantaloupe, and peppers.

When we did a little research into Hungry Harvest, however, we were immediately attracted to the work they do to support families in dietary needs in and around Baltimore. As well, you are on a week-to-week schedule with them, and you can modify your orders to supplement with fruits, vegetables, and even breads that are not in the package we ordered (they have everything from Mini Harvest, Full Harvest, to Super Harvest with conventional or organic options). You can even specify a full-fruit or full-veggie order. Their produce packages begin at just $15. So many options, and all of them are healthy and yummy.

The story behind Hungry Harvest is simple.

According to their website, Hungry Harvest has delivered over 3 million pounds of food, provided access to over 50,000 pounds of reduced-cost produce, and donated over half a million pounds of produced to their partner organizations, including SNAP.
Per their website, “Produce in a SNAP is a partnership between Hungry Harvest and Baltimore City Public Schools to bring fresh, affordable produce to food deserts in order to promote healthy eating and fight hunger. The goal is to allow food-insecure families and individuals who could benefit from affordable produce, including those on government assistance programs such as SNAP/EBT, WIC, and SSDI, to stretch their food budgets and put nutritious produce on their dinner table.”
To be honest, they exist because the statistics cited on their website are startling and speak for themselves.
  • 40% of food in the US goes to waste.
  • 16 million children in America struggle with hunger.
  • 6 billion pounds of fruit and vegetables go wasted each year in the US.
  • Each year, American consumers, businesses, and farmers spend $218 billion, or 1.3% of GDP, a year growing, processing, transporting, and disposing food that is never eaten.
  • If food waste were a country, it would be the third largest greenhouse gas emitter behind the US and China.
  • If one-quarter of the food wasted were saved, it would be enough to feed 870 million hungry people globally.
And the list continues, but that was enough for us to realize that what Hungry Harvest is doing for our communities right here in Baltimore is making a difference.
By ordering food from them, we are supporting their mission:
“We believe that no food should go to waste and no person should go hungry. That’s why we source 🍐, hand pack and securely deliver delicious boxes of recovered produce a weekly and bi-weekly basis. For every delivery, we subsidize 1-2 lbs of produce for families living in food deserts through our Produce in a SNAP sites. We currently deliver in Maryland, DC, Northern Virginia, Philly, South Jersey, and South Florida.”
Amy and I just finished our first meal with Hungry Harvest produce, and we are excited to continue to support them every way we can. They have many volunteer and staff options available to be a part of their mission. As we continue to improve our health, it’s good to know we are helping a worthwhile organization like Hungry Harvest improve the lives of others as well.

Hungry Harvest offers many discounts and incentives. If you are interested in ordering produce from Hungry Harvest and want to save on your first order, let them know that you heard about them from Amy VanWestervelt. We are excited to do everything we can to spread the word of how they are helping so many in our own communities.

Life Story Strategies: Understanding the Difference Between Memoir and Autobiography

Life Story Strategies: Understanding the Difference Between Memoir and Autobiography

(Each week, I will be responding, in depth, to questions I receive on my Memoir Writing Group on Facebook. The group is free, and we focus on the art and craft of writing our life stories.)

A few days ago, a new writer to our group, Billy, posed this query:

I have several ideas for memoirs I wanna write but not sure where to get started. I am a basketball coach and have been close to 30 years….This is one subject I do plan on writing but I am unsure if I should write about all of my experiences in one memoir or possibly write several. For example I started a travel team in 2013. I considered writing about just those experiences and [then write] other memoirs concerning other time periods from my coaching. Any advice from you veteran writers would be appreciated.

This is a great question, Billy, and it’s one that most individuals who want to share their story ask. How much do I include? What do I leave out? Why?

Writing your memoir is a lot different than writing your biography, which includes a more exhaustive story of your entire life. You — in a compilation of unrelated events — are more the theme than any other event or defining aspect of your life.

If we consider your biography to be an all-encompassing, chronological look at your life, a memoir is a magnifying glass into one particular aspect of your life where you want to focus on a theme, or showcase a particular aspect of who you are. Consider the four possible examples below.

  1. A musician might focus on the hardships of “making it” in the music industry, selecting the key events that helped her become an established singer/songwriter.
  2. A teacher might focus on the hardships in his life that helped him become a more selfless educator.
  3. An addict might focus on the events that led to addiction, the struggles to break the addiction, and the challenges faced every day in staying clean.
  4. A coach might focus on the road to the big state championship, which might include 3-5 experiences as a child/young adult that molded his or her unique and perhaps unconventional coaching style.

What all of these examples have in common is that the events are selected to contribute to a greater message, a greater theme, rather than serve as a nice, broad survey of what might be a very interesting life.

If I am a coach writing about the success of one particular group comprising castaways from other teams, I might include the story of when I, as a young player, was cut from three teams before an unconventional coach saw unrealized promise in my game. Because that coach believed in me, I was able to believe in the once-discarded players that took us to the championship game.

Every detail, every story shared contributes to the bigger theme of the memoir.

As a review to some, and new to others, Lee Gutkind and Philip Gerard, the gurus of Creative Nonfiction, have outlined the basic characteristics of the genre. You can see how memoir fits nicely here:

  • Has an apparent and deeper subject (it’s that deeper subject that the memoir focuses on);
  • Is timely and is also timeless;
  • Tells a good, entertaining story (has a strong beginning, middle, and end);
  • Is crafted with intent (the author is deliberate in how the story is written); and
  • Includes a reflection on behalf of the writer (written in first person).

The debate rages on whether it must all be true. Hardcore believers in the genre will tell you, affirmatively, Yes. Those who might fall a little left of the strict journalistic style of writing believe it is okay to “modify” the story in a way that contributes to the overall truth of the memoir. Those completely to the far left of the continuum will tell you that “part fact, part fiction” is perfectly acceptable to be called a memoir.

I guess you could say I’m a hardcore memoir writer with tendencies to glance a little to the left, now and then. More on that debate in another post, though!

When selecting the parts of your life to include in your memoir, the process can be a grueling one, as there are so many variables to consider. My recommendation is that you spend some time brainstorming everything that is seemingly related. Keep a running list in your personal journal (it’s for your eyes only, so no worries about being judged about what’s on your list!), and begin to narrow the field of choices when you figure out what you want your memoir to focus on.

Ask yourself:

  • What changes in me do I want the reader to see clearly?
  • What are the events that led up to those changes?
  • What events created tension in my life that are dramatic and suspenseful for my reader?
  • What events might my reader relate to most clearly?

As you can see in the questions above, you are writing for yourself, but you are writing for an audience as well. Consider both as you select the events that really represent your life story and your memoir’s focus.

Writing your memoir is a very personal endeavor. Write for yourself first; you always get to choose what you share — and when — with your audience.

Here’s to you and your story. May the words flow freely today.

Rus VW

Coming Soon: Your Story Matters: An Essential Guide to Writing Memoir, a new eBook for writers of all levels, filled with the fundamentals of memoir, suggested strategies, and takeaway prompts to help you share your life story.

Pedestrian Safety: An Urgent Matter in Maryland

Pedestrian Safety: An Urgent Matter in Maryland

Exclusive for Baltimore County Breaking News
By Rus VanWestervelt (@rusvw13, rus@bcobreakingnews.com)

I’ve been working with Baltimore County Breaking News for more than two years now, and we’ve covered a lot of tragic events during that time. It’s been heartbreaking to be the dispatcher sharing the news with our followers, or the writer providing the follow-up story that offers the tragic loss of human life. I’ve seen it from both sides; it was just as heartbreaking when other news agencies shared the details of my own brother’s death in a motorcycle accident in Carroll County.

The injury, or loss, of any life is tough, but when it’s senselessly brought on by the mindless ignorance of drivers or pedestrians, and the breaking of common-sense laws, it infuriates all of us even more.

One of the most abused laws in Maryland involves pedestrian traffic.

The stats are clear that we have an urgent need to address this issue more aggressively. In 2012, Maryland was rated as the seventh most dangerous state in the United States for pedestrians (Florida was the worst, with Delaware, Arizona, South Carolina, Hawaii, and North Carolina named 2-6, respectively).

And, according to recent statistics provided by multiple sources (including the Governor’s Highway Safety Association, the Maryland State Highway Administration, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), Maryland has seen, on average, about 100 pedestrian deaths each year in the last two decades (about 20% of all road-related deaths annually). Shockingly, the number of children ages 5-9 killed as pedestrians comprised 14% of all pedestrian crashes in 1998.

Annually, up to 70% of these deaths are related to pedestrian error; however, many injuries and deaths occur with pedestrians lawfully in crosswalks at intersections or in mid-block (when a crosswalk is placed in the middle of a street).

Drivers Must Follow Maryland Laws

Maryland law is clear when it comes to yielding the right-of-way to pedestrians (as summarized by the Montgomery County Government).

  • A driver of a vehicle must come to a complete stop when a pedestrian is crossing the roadway in a crosswalk.
  • It is unlawful for a driver to pass a vehicle that is stopped for a pedestrian in either a marked or unmarked crosswalk. This includes in shopping centers, especially in front of busy stores where there is high foot traffic.
  • Vehicles facing a green signal, including any vehicle turning right or left, must yield right-of-way to any pedestrian lawfully within an adjacent crosswalk.
  • Vehicles facing a red signal or red arrow signal must stop at the intersection at the clearly marked stop line or before entering the crosswalk.
  • The driver of a vehicle shall exercise due care to avoid colliding with any pedestrian, shall warn any pedestrian by sounding a horn, and shall exercise proper precaution on observing any confused or incapacitated pedestrians.
  • The driver of a vehicle shall drive at an appropriate reduced speed when any special danger exists as to pedestrians.

Pedestrians Share The Responsibility For Safety

Pedestrians need to be smart about how they walk alongside, or cross, roads.

  • A pedestrian facing a steady red traffic signal may not enter the roadway.
  • A pedestrian may not start to cross the roadway in the direction of a solid “don’t walk” or “upraised hand” signal.
  • If a pedestrian crosses a roadway at any point other than in a marked crosswalk or in an unmarked crosswalk at an intersection, the pedestrian shall yield the right-of-way to any vehicle.
  • In an intersection where a traffic control signal is in operation, a pedestrian may cross only in a marked crosswalk.
  • A pedestrian may not cross an intersection diagonally unless authorized by a traffic control device.
  • Where a sidewalk is provided, a pedestrian may not walk along or on an adjacent roadway.  Where no sidewalk is provided, a pedestrian may walk only on the left shoulder or on the left side of the roadway facing traffic.

Baltimore County Police Encourage Education In Pedestrian Safety

In addition to these laws, The Baltimore County Police Department provides these simple reminders for parents to speak with their children about pedestrian safety.

  • Always cross at traffic lights, marked crosswalks or intersections.
  • Obey traffic signals at all times. Don’t attempt to cross if the signal tells you to stop.
  • Stay alert when crossing. Even when the signal says WALK, you should check that the path is clear.
  • Always check in all directions for approaching vehicles before crossing the street. If there is a vehicle approaching, wait until it passes before trying to cross.
  • Try to make eye contact with drivers before stepping off the curb.
  • Walk on the sidewalk whenever possible. If there is no sidewalk, walk on the side of the road, facing traffic.
  • Wear bright or reflective clothing at night.
  • Avoid distraction when crossing. Turn off headphones and put away your cell phone before crossing.

The Baltimore County Breaking News Team would love nothing more than to report that Maryland has become the safest place in the United States for pedestrians. Let us each do our part — as drivers and as walkers — in ensuring that everyone reaches their destinations safely.